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10 Lessons I've Learned

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A good idea doesn’t care who has it. Your clients as well as their customers often wax eloquent. You discover that wisdom by merely talking with them, then enhancing their wealth of experience by writing down and applying what you've learned.

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If writing and designing are your principal skill sets. mastering the verbal and visual will
make you an efficient and effective business communicator no matter your life pursuit.

 

Real world stuff creative practioners don't necessarily master in grad school

10 lessons I've learned…

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Follow your self-starter instincts — then own your decisions. Digital is as fast paced as it gets. The learning curves often seem endless. They are. Get used to moving targets in a glut of media messaging.

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You quickly learn to manage and prioritize your most precious asset:  
Your time. Once it's gone, it ain't coming back. Rule #1: Minimize your daily distractions. (Any distraction list is way too lengthy to mention). Just remember your main priorities: assisting your clients, improving the output of your fellow associates — and driving revenue for your enterprise!

 

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You earn mutual respect and longevity by anticipating your clients’ evolving needs, then acting on them, even before they show up on a creative brief.

 

You learn to appreciate the art & science of research, media selection, SEO, KPIs, and the plethora of marketing metrics.

 

You understand that deadlines are not made to be broken, or missed. Same goes for budgets. Renegotiate if you can, but do not equate size of budget with effective creative results.

 

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If writing and designing are your principal
skill sets, mastering words and visuals will
make you an efficient and effective business
communicator no matter your life pursuit.

 

A good idea doesn’t care who has it. Your
clients as well as their customers often wax eloquent. You discover that wisdom by
merely talking with them, then enhancing their wealth of experience by writing down and applying what you've learned.

 

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However, ideas and concepts are often a dime a dozen. It’s great executions that are valuable. So don’t settle for being just a good writer or a good designer or a good "brainstormer." Start by being a good listener. Then aim for becoming a great writer, then a great designer — and ultimately a persuasive communicator. Think of yourself as a doctor, a surgeon of sorts — always in pursuit of solving, or at least diminishing other people's pain points.

 

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In the world of creative output, there are those who work to live (these are mostly the logical left-brain thinkers) in search of a harmonious life/work balance. Then there are those who live to work (often the
emotional right-brainers). Put me down for
the latter. I was nurtured long after the
"Mad Men" advertising era. I managed to
avoid most of the showboating, boozing and
skirt chasing. My influencers were icons like
Leo Burnett, David Ogilvy, Shirley Polykoff,
George Lois, Mary Wells and Bill Bernbach.
All were exemplary writers and art
directors — big idea people — who likely
shared, with much delight, the feelings of a
fellow legendary ad man of their day, Jerry Della Femina, who fervently believed in one of his most memorable observations:
"Advertising is the most fun you can have with your clothes on."
My sentiment exactly. I say, enjoy the pursuit, and celebrate all of your accomplishments along the way. But mostly, enjoy the pursuit.

 

About Jim Sweas

You’re a team player, but often a team captain, whether among staff or freelance contributors. Any creative director’s ideal function among a team:  First, listen to all parties. Then lead — or follow — but definitely get out of the way of any perceived obstacles. Your ultimate goal: Stay passionate about every pursuit, and motivate those around you to do the same. Remind all that any success formula usually consists of 10 percent inspiration and 90 percent perspiration. Your failures are often among your most valuable lessons. Thank you for the timeless reminder, Mr. Edison.

 

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